Diverticulitis Diet-What Foods to Eat To Reduce Pain and Symptoms

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Diverticulitis risk increases with individuals who consume a low-fiber diet. Diverticulitis treatment includes a diet that will reduce the symptoms of diverticulitis and the related stomach pain and digestive problems. In severe instances, this diverticulitis diet could include liquids such as water, fruit juices, broth and ice pops. With juices, they should not be acidic, as they may disrupt the digestive system.

Reducing Diverticulitis with Dieting

Diverticulitis risk increases with individuals who consume a low-fiber diet. There are a handful of diverticulitis related symptoms, including abdominal pain, chills, fever, nausea, vomiting and weight loss. Complications from diverticulitis include rectal bleeding, an abscess in the colon wall and intestinal obstructions. In some cases, when diverticulitis is extreme, it may need to be treated with surgery or antibiotics.

Severe Diverticulitis and Liquids

Diverticulitis treatment includes a diet that will reduce the symptoms of diverticulitis and the related stomach pain and digestive problems. In severe instances, this diverticulitis diet could include liquids such as water, fruit juices, broth and ice pops. With juices, they should not be acidic, as they may disrupt the digestive system.

The Importance of Fiber and a Diverticulitis Diet

Eventually, you can return to a regular diet, though it is advisable to begin with low fiber foods. Fiber is the part of foods that the body is unable to digest. There are two types of fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and turns into a soft jelly like substance as it passes through the digestive system. Insoluble fiber remains relatively the same as it passes through the intestines. Both types of fiber aid digestion and inhibit constipation.

Recommended Fiber Consumption with a Diverticulitis Diet

The American Dietetic Association recommends 20 to 35 grams of fiber daily, which includes 6-8 grams of soluble fiber. The build up of fiber in your diet should be gradual, as a brisk increase could result in gas, diarrhea and bloating. Drinking water with a diverticulitis diet is important because the fiber is better digested with fluids.

Recommended Foods for a Diverticulitis Diet

Whole wheat breads, grains, pastas and cereals as well as brown rice, wheat germ and oatmeal are recommended foods. Vegetables such as carrots, broccoli, green pepper, Brussels sprouts, spinach, squash and turnips are also advisable for a diverticulitis diet. Doctors suggest eating fruits such as apple, banana, blackberries, fig pineapple, cherries, blueberries, dates, apricot, grapefruit and nectarine. Two to three servings of dairy is suggested as well as two to three servings of meat or meat substitutes. Meat substitutes include beans such as aduki, black beans, kidney beans and fava beans as well as peanut butter and other smooth, nut based butters.

Diverticulitis is a painful disorder that affects millions of people. Fortunately, with proper diet, its symptoms can be greatly reduced. The important thing to remember is that consistency is key. As Diverticulitis will continue to persist, remember to maintain a healthy diverticulitis to avoid any of the painful consequences.