Branding Goes Mainstream

Modern life continues to evolve in a very fast-paced way, as the innovations of the digital age continue to change the way we communicate and work. Today every person who is working or pursuing some kind of career, whether it is in the arts or the sciences, needs to make an impressive presentation of themselves online as well as in the “real” world.

Today, professions that are far outside the world of acting and performance still call on practitioners to present an impressive “brand” to the world. The online world now serves as a way to quickly research people on sites like LinkedIn and Facebook, to see what they look like and what kind of references and credentials they have to offer. While some may see this as an example of the modern world’s stunning shallowness, but most people today are accepting that this is just a new approach to connecting with people professionally.

Every Profession Needs a Great Image

Today even professions that once seemed to spend very little time focusing on a positive public image are also expected to present a “brand.” Doctors can now choose good-looking designer medical scrubs to wear while treating patients, and many of these scrubs and lab coats are as attractive as can be. Medical groups now use websites with photos of the medical staff featured alongside testimonials praising the individual physician’s skills at treatment and in dealing with patients. This is a far cry from the staid image the medical world once embraced, but this is how people prefer to communicate these days, and there’s no doubt people today are also influenced by the attractive actors they see on television playing everything from doctors to lawyers and educators.

Yes, the world is changing, but that doesn’t have to be a negative thing. Getting a good sense of who you will be dealing with professionally via websites and google searches means people can get a better sense of who’ll they’ll be interacting with. All of that can be positive if it leads to more positive professional outcomes, and less unwelcome surprises, too.